Chile and it´s valleys

Presentation

Chile’s diverse geography, with the Andes Mountains to the east, the Atacama Desert to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Patagonian Ice Fields to the south, and its wide-ranging climates and soil types, make it a land that is beneficial for viticulture. Transversal river valleys that run from east to west, from the Andes to the sea, allow the cool sea breezes to blow inland every evening, and Chile’s Mediterranean climate, with its warm, dry summers, and cold, rainy winters, is ideal for wine production.

Chile’s Mediterranean climate, with its warm, dry summers, and cold, rainy winters, is ideal for wine production. The interaction between the sea and the Andes Mountains has a positive effect on the growing season in the vineyards, which benefit from the sunny days and temperatures that drop dramatically each night, creating a broad daily temperature oscillation, which helps wine grapes develop fresh fruit flavors and good acidity. In the case of the red wines, it helps develop deep color in the grape skins and high levels of antioxidants and quality.

Chile and it´s valleys

Our Valleys

The challenge of creating wines that faithfully reflect their origins and show the unique diversity of Chile’s soils and climates is evident in our tremendous portfolio of varieties: Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Carmenere, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah.

The Central Valley (Maipo, Cachapoal, Colchagua, Curicó, and Maule Valleys), along with the coastal Casablanca and San Antonio Valleys, and Itata in the south, are the places that these varieties give rise to wines with excellent and elegant fruit expression and that are fresh, well balanced, and easy to drink. It is thanks to these valleys that we ca enjoy varieties that are characterized by their diversity of climate, soils, and production.

Casablanca valley
San Antonio Valley
Maipo Valley
Cachapoal Valley
Colchagua Valley
Curicó Valley
Maule Valley
Itata Valley
Central Valley
Our Valleys

Casablanca valley

Located between the Andes and the Coastal Mountain Ranges, approximately 80 km from Santiago.
Due to its proximity to the sea, morning fogs routinely enter the vineyards and produces a humid climate. The soils are rich in clay and decomposed minerals, and the combination of factors make this zone ideal for slow-ripening white varieties and reds such as Pinot Noir and Merlot.

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Our Valleys

San Antonio Valley

Located 120 km from Santiago and along the Pacific coast, the San Antonio Valley has a wide range of clay soils, and the climate is strongly influenced by the sea. This special combination of factors lends tremendous minerality to the fruit grown there.

Our Valleys

Maipo Valley

Located around the Maipo River, from the foot of the Andes to the western side of the Coastal Range, the Maipo Valley is one of Chile’s oldest wine regions. The reds from this zone are known for their tremendous structure and long aging potential, and the Cabernet Sauvignons produced here typically have aromas of red fruits and balsamic notes. 
The combination of its temperate-warm climate with long, dry summers (December through March), its rocky soils, and extensive geography result in conditions apt for a large variety of wines and wine styles from the same variety.

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Our Valleys

Cachapoal Valley

The hot summers and rainy winters in this zone make it perfect for red wine production. Located 100 km south of Santiago, this region stands out for its mountainous areas that drop into the interior of the valley and create broad daily temperature oscillations that contribute to the typicity of the wines.

Our Valleys

Colchagua Valley

Located 150 km south of Santiago, the Colchagua Valley, with its Mediterranean climate, high luminosity, and clay soils rich in minerals, offers ideal conditions for red varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Carmenere, and Malbec. It is home to many of the country’s most important wineries, and its internationally renowned Colchagua Wine Route makes it a leader in Chilean wine tourism.

Our Valleys

Curicó Valley

Just south of Colchagua, and 220 km south of Santiago, the Curicó Valley has a moderate Mediterranean climate with summers marked by hot days and cold, damp nights. The winters are influenced by the high-pressure system of the Pacific, which therefore results in substantial rainfall. The flatlands have eroded, mineral-rich soils with good permeability, and the higher zones have a predominance of sand and stones.

Our Valleys

Maule Valley

Located 260 km south of Santiago, the Maule Valley extends from the Andes Mountains to the Coastal Range. Its soils tend to consist of clay and granite, especially in the sectors closest to the coast, where the sea breezes have a cooling effect on the valley.

Our Valleys

Itata Valley

Itata, one of Chile’s oldest wine regions, lies between the Ñuble and Itata Rivers and has sandy granitic soils rich in minerals. It is cooler than the more northerly valleys, and has very well-defined seasons.

Our Valleys

Central Valley

Chile’s Central Valley is a denomination of origin that consists of four sub-regions: the Maipo, Rapel (Cachapoal and Colchagua), Curicó Valley, and Maule Valleys. Its primary characteristic is its Mediterranean climate that presents warm days and cold nights due to the cold air that drops down from the Andes each evening. Another important influence in this valley is that the Humboldt Current in the Pacific Ocean has a cooling effect on the vineyards.

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